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20110301
20110331
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
you! [ laughter ] >> couric: tonight, japan asks for u.s. help cooling nuclear reactors damaged by the earthquake as it tries desperately to prevent meltdown. i'm katie couric. also tonight, the unfolding humanitarian crisis. four days after the earthquake and tsunami, there are shortages of food and housing for the living. body bags and coffins for the growing number of dead. the search goes on for victims in towns virtually wiped off the map. and how safe are we with nuclear plants here at home built on fault lines and striking distances of tsunamis. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone, any one of them alone would be overwhelming, but japan is dealing with three crises: humanitarian, economic, and nuclear, including the possibility of a meltdown. we'll have much more about that in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10
and a third meltdown at japan's nuclear facilities. american troops offshore exposed to radiation, as officials struggle to contain the catastrophe. >>> moment of impact. new images of the tsunami, rushing ashore. breaking through seawalls. rushing past airport security. washing away entire villages. >>> and look at what the waves picked up and left behind. a ferry on a house. a bus on a rooftop. a toilet dangling from power lines. and the man who floated away from his house, clinging for life. rescued ten miles from shore. >> this morning we're live in japan, with diane sawyer, christiane amanpour and david muir. and we ask the question, is this only the beginning of the devastation? >>> and good morning, america. joining us is "world news" anchor, diane sawyer, is who is there in sendai, japan, where the scope of the destruction is staggering. aftershocks still rocking the region. >> dealing with two crises. humanitarian. and an urgent disaster, to avoid a nuclear emergency. there was a third partial meltdown overnight. 11 injured in the blast. and after american officials detec
>> i've done that. >> yes, you have. that's going to d >>> tonight from japan, this is "world news," reporting on the disaster in the pacific. now, there are four. four troubled nuclear reactors at one site. what happens if they all melt? and who are the 50 brave workers who agreed to stay inside and try to save everyone else? >>> we go out with rescue crews, calling out for signs of life in the rubble. "make a noise," they say. "is anybody there?" hello? is anybody there? is anybody there? and survivors did emerge today. >>> and we tell you what is the real danger for the united states. what about that run on potassium iodide pills? >>> and, on "world news," lessons for all of us, from survivors of that hiroshima radiation 60 years ago. >>> good evening to everyone in the united states. here in japan, as we said, there are 50 workers inside a nuclear power plant, and they are battling the complete unknown at this moment. trying to prevent a nuclear power meltdown. and in this breaking news, we have received word that there is another fire, a new fire under way at one of those reac
>> couric: tonight, from the air and from the ground, japan launches a water assault on those damaged nuclear reactors to try to cool them. and a voluntary evacuation of americans is under way. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama tries to reassure this country we are safe. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast. >> couric: libya's moammar qaddafi vows to retake all rebel-held territory as the u.n. considers military action to stop him. and from hiroshima to fukushima, her fear that japan is on the verge of another nuclear catastrophe. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. there is so much concern in this country about nuclear radiation from jay japan that president obama went on national television today to try to calm every down. he said he does not expect harmful levels of radiation from those damaged reactors to reach hawaii, alaska, or the west coast. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americ
in a moment. it's tuesday morning in japan and four days after the earthquake and tsunami. the death toll continues to rise. officially 1,900, but one local police chief estimates 10,000 have died in his province alone. and as the search goes on for victims, at least a thousand washed up on shore today. coffins and body bags are in short supply and crematoriums are overwhelmed. u.s. and other foreign aid is pouring in for the millions of survivors in need of food, water and housing. emergency shelters are overflowing. japan's central bank pumped billions of dollars into the country's economy to shore it up. the prime minister is taking charge of managing the nuclear crisis and he's asking the u.s. for technical expertise to cool the damaged reactors and prevent a meltdown. u.s. officials say experts see no scenario in which harmful levels of radiation will reach the united states. we have a team of correspondents deployed throughout japan tonight. first, celia hatton in fukushima >> reporter: japan's nuclear nightmare continues, a second hydrogen explosion at the fukushima
>>> good morning. breaking news. japan's nuclear crisis takes a dire turn. high levels of radiation spewing from the damaged nuclear plant following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. an official is calling it, quote, a very bad scerio as officials work to contain the risk today, tuesday, march 15, officials work to contain the risk today, tuesday, march 15, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> officials in japan are saying the radiation leaking from the crippled nuclear power plant is enough to impact human health. >> the big concern is the number 2 reactor which exploded on monday sending more radiation into the air and then a fire at reactor 4 broke out. that one had been shut down for maintenance before the quake. all but 50 employees of the plant have been evacuated. in a nationally televised address japan's prime minister urged anyone living near the plant who had not already evacuated to seal themselves indoors and warned of the very high risk of more leaks. >> you hear
'll see you next fox news sunday. >>> this is a fox news alert. right now in japan there is a state of emergency declared at a second nuclear plant. good afternoon. i'm jamie colby. >> and i'm eric shawn. japan authorities say a cooling system has failed at one of the quake damaged plants but there could be a partial meltdown but radioactivity has not spread. about 200 people may have been exposed the nuclear concern escalating if they cannot contain the problems, the death toll is reaching in the thousands. gregg palkot north of tokyo. what is the latest. >> reporter: japanese prime minister, he said it is the worst crisis they have been facing. as you noted a nuclear plant, another nuclear reactor where we are affected the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. authorities had to shove water to try to cool it down to avoid a meltdown. they say they got it under control but they are checking for radioactive levels and they are making an evacuation around the complex. a police official in one sector here was saying yesterday, 10,000 people were missing, today he says he thinks the
of intervention? >>> and disaster in japan. exhausted engineers struggle to get power restored at the country's crippled nuclear reactors. in the hopes of avoiding a meltdown. meanwhile, high levels of radiation begin to show up in food in japan, as the country's prime minister urges his people to show courage in the wake of their unspeakable tragedy. we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march 19th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> new york city waking up to a sunny saturday morning. the last saturday before spring begins. welcome to "the early show." i'm rebecca jarvis. >> and i'm russ mitchell. two major stories to get to this morning. we begin with libya. this morning libyan forces loyal to moammar gadhafi entered the outskirts of benghazi in eastern libya. opposition forces shot down a warplane that was bombing the city. the warfare continues as the libyan government denies its forces atacked benghazi and said it is observing a cease-fire. president obama warned mr. gadhafi must -- >> let me be clear. these
in radiation drives out the last line of defense, as another fire flares up at japan's crippled nuclear plant. >>> and the fukushima 50. new details this morning about the heroic team, facing death, working inside the scariest place on earth. even helicopters sent to spray the plant, turned back because of the danger as major aftershocks shake tokyo. >>> could the meltdown happen here? "gma" takes you inside an american working plant, to show what the workers face every day. >>. >>> and the run on medicine back home. the rush to buy iodine pills and radiation detecters. but just how worried should we be? >>> and good morning, america. an incredible story unfolding at that nuclear plant. the workers pulled out overnight, because of radiation levels. and they're standing by to go back in at this very hour, likely exposing themselves to so much more radiation. >> just to give a sense of how much risk they are facing, back to the chernobyl disaster. almost 50 of the workers there sacrificed their lives. more than 100 had radiation illness. since you all went to sleep, h
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. b
, in a reactor core, as japan faces a true nuclear catastrophe. workers burned by 10,000 times normal radiation. will parts of japan now be lost for generations? >>> in this country, superbug. growing concern this morning over a brand-new drug-resistant bacteria taking hold in california hospitals. is it on the move? dr. besser is standing by right here this morning. >>> crowning glory. this beauty queen wins her crown back in a highly publicized trial, after losing it because she was accused of being too fat. told to lay off the tacos. she's here live after her victory. >>> and put your paws up, going gaga this morning for polar cubs. two, new polar bears take the world stage. they're already capturing the world's heart. >>> good morning, again, everyone. thanks for spending the week with us. it's been good having david muir here with us. we're going to get to japan in a moment. >> so much breaking news this morning. >>> we're also tracking a story we broke at abc news. an air traffic controller working alone and asleep on the job at a major airport as two planes were landing. this morning, we
. meanwhile, japan and what is now the world's most expensive natural disaster. the government said today the earthquake and tsunami caused over $300 billion in damage. the human toll is also climbing with more than 9,500 dead, 16,000 are missing, fewer than ten are americans. the u.s. is now the first country to ban produce and dairy products from the area near the damaged nuclear plant. and in tokyo tonight parents are being warned not to give their infants tap water. radioactive iodine has been detected in the water at twice the level considered safe for babies. from tokyo, here's bill whitaker. >> reporter: tokyo mother of three tomoe ogino shows compassion for the refugees up north. now with the fallout hitting home, she feels fear. >> my concern is how long it's going to, this is going to take, you know, if it's going to finish at some point, if she can drink water. >> reporter: the fear is thyroid cancer, an infants fast growing thyroid absorbs much more of the radioactive iodine in the water than older children or adults. tomoe uses water to make formula for 4-month-old sayuki. it
arrested. it's been nearly two weeks since the earthquake and tsunami in japan. the recovery is only beginning and the crisis at that damaged nuclear plant is far from over. today, two plant workers were take on the the hospital after suffering from radioactive burns, and rescue workers say the evacuation zone around the plant has kept them from searching for the missing. the number of missing is now above 17,000 and the death toll has reached more than 8,800. meanwhile, in tokyo bill whitaker reports tap water has been declared safe again for infants. >> reporter: 24 hours after it was deemed unfit for infants, the regional governor declared tokyo's tap water delicious and safe for all. "let's all calm down," he said. nevertheless, shoppers, emptied store shelves, even waited in line for water with some storms limiting what people can by, the city began distributing 12 bottles of water each to the families of the 80,000 infants one year and under in tokyo. megumi hitosi got level for her baby. the level is down again. does that give you trust? "there's no way to get independent info
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)